Subject Verb Agreement in Collective Nouns


As a copy editor, it`s my job to ensure that every piece of content I work on is free from grammar and language errors. One area where I see a lot of confusion among writers is with subject-verb agreement in collective nouns.

Collective nouns refer to groups of people, animals, or objects. Examples include “team,” “herd,” “crowd,” and “family.” The challenge with collective nouns is that they can be singular or plural, depending on the context.

For example, if we use the word “team” as a singular noun, we say, “The team is playing well.” But if we use it as a plural noun, we say, “The team are celebrating their victory.”

Here are some important rules to keep in mind when dealing with subject-verb agreement in collective nouns:

1. Singular or plural?

The first step is to determine whether the collective noun is singular or plural. This can be tricky since some collective nouns can be both singular and plural, depending on the context.

For example, the word “family” can be either singular or plural. If we`re talking about a particular family, we use the singular form: “The Smith family is going on vacation.” But if we`re talking about more than one family, we use the plural: “The families are all gathering for the reunion.”

2. Look for clues.

One way to determine whether a collective noun is singular or plural is to look for clues in the sentence. For example, if we`re using the word “team,” and we`re referring to the entire group as a single unit, we use the singular verb form: “The team is playing well.” But if we`re referring to the individual members of the team, we use the plural: “The team are all talented athletes.”

3. Be consistent.

Consistency is key when dealing with subject-verb agreement in collective nouns. Once you`ve determined whether a collective noun is singular or plural, stick with that form throughout the sentence or paragraph.

For example, if you`re writing about a herd of elephants, use the plural verb form: “The herd of elephants are grazing in the field.” Don`t switch to the singular form midway through the sentence.

4. Use your ear.

Finally, when in doubt, use your ear. Read the sentence aloud and see if it sounds right. If it doesn`t, try switching the verb form and see if that sounds better.

Remember, subject-verb agreement is an essential part of clear and effective writing. By keeping these rules in mind when dealing with collective nouns, you can avoid common mistakes and ensure that your writing is polished and professional.